Operation
Entebbe
  Operation
Nimrod
   
 
   
Operation Entebbe

What Happened
   Background
   Preparation
   Rescue
   Aftermath

Famous Quotes



In the Media
   Books
   DVDs
   Videos


Our Other Military Sites

World War II
Operation Barbarossa
1941 German Invasion of Russia
Operation Citadel
1943 The Battle of Kursk
Operation Dragoon
1944 Invasion of southern France
Operation Varsity
1945 Crossing the Rhine

Invasions That Never Were
Operation Sealion
1940 German invasion of England
Operation Olympic
1945 US invasion of southern Japan
Operation Coronet
1946 US invasion of northern Japan

Special Forces
Operation Entebbe
1976 Entebbe Airport Rescue
Operation Nimrod
1980 Iranian Embassy Siege

British Cold War Operations
Operation Musketeer
1956 Suez Crisis
Operation Corporate
1982 Falklands War
Operation Black Buck
1982 Vulcan raids on Port Stanley
Operation Granby
1990-91 Persian Gulf

British Post Cold War
Operation Herrick
2002- Afghanistan

 
   
Operation Entebbe   >   What Happened   >   Rescue

   
 

Rescue


Four Israeli C-130 Hercules aircraft were loaded with the rescue force and their vehicles, just before dawn on Saturday July 3rd. Additionally, medical staff were loaded on board an Israeli Air Force Boeing 707.

The aircraft took-off at around 1pm, but did not receive the final authorization to go ahead from the Israeli cabinet until the C-130s were refueled in the air, just to the South of the Sinai peninsula.

The medical-support Boeing 707 headed for Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, Kenya. The C-130s headed directly for Entebbe without the assistance of ground control, and despite some stormy weather on the way, landed at 23:01, just one minute behind schedule,

As the C-130s touched down, the rear cargo door was already open to allow fast unloading. While the aircraft was still moving, some commandos rolled out and placed emergency beacons, just in case the runway lights were turned off.

A black Mercedes and Land Rover vehicles which were on board one of the C-130 Hercules were first unloaded. In an attempt to fool any Ugandan guards, these vehicles were driven towards the terminal building at high-speed, in a similar way to that done by Idi Amin. Two sentries who knew that Idi Amin had recently purchased a white Mercedes ordered the vehicles to stop, but they were immediately shot dead by the Israeli commandos who then entered the airport terminal building itself.

When Israeli commandos entered the terminal building they shouted "Get down! Get down!" in both English and Hebrew. One hostage, Jean-Jacques Maimoni, who stood up was shot by the commandos who mistook him for a terrorist. Additionally, two other hostages, Pasko Cohen and Ida Borochovitch, were killed in the brief firefight. All the hijackers were killed, and the Israeli commandos suffered no casualties during their assault.

The Israelis then used armoured personal carriers, carried on the other C-130 Hercules, to secure the airport perimeter and other airport buildings. All the Hercules aircraft were refueled from Entebbe's own fuel tanks, using pumping equipment that the commandos had brought with them.

Before taking-off, to prevent any pursuit, the commandos destroyed 11 Ugandan Army Air Force MiG-17 fighters which were at the airport. The hostages were then loaded and the C-130 Hercules departed for Israel via Nairobi, Kenya. It was during the loading that the Israeli commandos suffered their only casualty: Lieutenant Colonel Yoni Netanyahu was killed by Ugandan gunfire. Out of 103 hostages, 3 had been killed, and 10 were wounded.

45 Ugandan soldiers were killed, and an unknown number wounded during the raid, as were 6 hijackers.

< < Previous: Preparation Next > >: Aftermath


   



 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Note: This site is not affiliated with nor endorsed by any military or government organization.

Copyright © 2007-2014, Answers 2000 Limited

CERTAIN CONTENT THAT APPEARS ON THIS SITE COMES FROM AMAZON SERVICES LLC. THIS CONTENT IS PROVIDED 'AS IS' AND IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR REMOVAL AT ANY TIME.

Disclosure: Our company's websites' content (including this website's content) includes advertisements for our own company's websites, products, and services, and for other organization's websites, products, and services. In the case of links to other organization's websites, our company may receive a payment, (1) if you purchase products or services, or (2) if you sign-up for third party offers, after following links from this website. Unless specifically otherwise stated, information about other organization's products and services, is based on information provided by that organization, the product/service vendor, and/or publicly available information - and should not be taken to mean that we have used the product/service in question. Additionally, our company's websites contain some adverts which we are paid to display, but whose content is not selected by us, such as Google AdSense ads. For more detailed information, please see Advertising/Endorsements Disclosures

Our sites use cookies, some of which may already be set on your computer. Use of our site constitutes consent for this. For details, please see Privacy.

Contact Us   Privacy   Terms of Use   Advertising/Endorsements Disclosures

In Association With Amazon.com
Answers 2000 Limited is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.
In Assocation With AllPosters.com

All trademarks are property of their respective owners.
All third party content and adverts are copyright of their respective owners.